What’s Up for December 2017

What’s Up for December?  The Night Sky from NASA JPL. The best meteor shower of the year and brightest stars! See where and when to look.

Five Years of Curiosity on Mars

Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today. The rover currently is climbing through the foothills of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mountain formed from sediment brought in by water and wind. This talk will cover the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.

Speakers:
James K. Erickson, Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager, JPL
Ashwin R. Vasavada, Mars Science Laboratory Project Scientist, JPL

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Streamed live on 13 Jul 2017

Interstellar Flight – Documentary

Cosmic Journeys explores the challenges of interstellar flight and the technological possibilities that may one day send us on a long voyage out into the galaxy. What imperatives will define the mission when it launches and finally arrives: exploration and science, or a struggle for survival?

What’s Up for November 2017

Catch planet pairs and watch the moon pass stellar superstars! See Jupiter and Venus at dawn, the Moon shine near star clusters, and meteor activity all month long.

A Journey to Alpha Centauri – Christian Marois (SETI Talks 2017)

he Alpha Centauri star system is ideal to search for habitable planets by various observing techniques due to its proximity and wide range of stellar masses. Following the recent discovery of an Earth-size planet candidate located inside the Proxima Centauri habitable zone, Dr. Marois will discuss this remarkable discovery and the planet’s potential to find life. He will also present our current instrument project for the Gemini South observatory, TIKI, to discover similar planets around the two Sun-like pair located 15,000 AU from Proxima Centauri. The Alpha Centauri system is the prime target of the Breakthrough Starshot program, a project to send small quarter-size probes to take resolve images of these new worlds, and to prepare for Humanity’s first step into a new star system.

Dr Marois completed his Ph.D. at the Université de Montréal in 2004. The main topic of his thesis work was to understand the limits in exoplanet imaging and to design innovating observing strategies. After his thesis, he did postdoctoral researches at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of California Berkeley and NRC. In 2008, while at NRC, he led the team that took the first image of another planetary system (HR 8799) using the Keck and Gemini telescopes. He is currently pursuing his research at the NRC Herzberg where he is part of the Gemini Planet Imager campaign, and leading the development of instruments for imaging Earth-like planets at Gemini South and at the TMT.

What’s Up for May 2017

This month, Jupiter is well placed for easy evening viewing, Saturn rises before midnight, and the moon dances with Venus, Mercury and Mars.

Cassini’s First Dive Between Saturn and Its Rings

After the first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft called home to mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. See highlights from the scene at JPL on April 26-27, 2017, and some of the first raw images the spacecraft sent back from its closest-ever look at Saturn’s atmosphere. For more information about Cassini and its “Grand Finale,” visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

How radio telescopes show us unseen galaxies: Natasha Hurley-Walker

Our universe is strange, wonderful and vast, says astronomer Natasha Hurley-Walker. A spaceship can’t carry you into its depths (yet) — but a radio telescope can. In this mesmerizing talk, Hurley-Walker shows how she probes the mysteries of the universe using special technology that reveals light spectrums we can’t see.

What’s Up for April 2017

What’s up in the night sky this April? Jupiter, king of the planets is visible all night long, and the Lyrids meteor shower peaks on April 22

Participants List for Astronomy Camp on 30th December 2016

5th batch Participants List (Class-VII- DPS Surat) for the Astronomy Camp held at Delhi Public School Tapi on the night of 30th December 2016.

SR NO Class Name Admission No. Student Name
1 VII-D B-0199-11 ARJAVI ARYA
2 VII-C M-0427-07 ANANYA ANUJ SARAF
3 VII-E M-0458-07 ANUSHKA KHURANA
4 VII-E N-1169-08 ARSHIA ABHISHEK KOKRA
5 VII-E N-1061-08 JANVI TARUN KOTHARI
6 VII-E N-1037-08 KHUSHI BHARAT SHAH
7 VII-E N-1052-08 KRUTIKA POONAM MALPANI
8 VII-E N-1031-08 NAISHA AAKASH PATEL
9 VII-E N-1095-08 NEVA BHAVESH KUMAR PATEL
10 VII-E M-0353-07 PRACHI SANJAY KEDIA
11 VII-E M-0388-07 RITU DIVYESH VAIDYA
12 VII-E M-0335-07 SHRAVYA ANUJ DHAMI
13 VII-E M-0379-07 VINESHA ANKUR SHAH
14 VII-E M-0376-07 VRINDA VINOD NAGDEV
15 VII-F F-0261-15 ANANYA ROY KARMAKAR
16 VII-F N-1148-08 HEER DHARMESHBHAI PATEL
17 VII-F M-0390-07 MANA AJAY SHAH
18 VII-F M-0426-07 RIYA VISHAL SHAH
19 VII-F G-0247-16 RUDRIKA SINGH
20 VII-G N-1091-08 DHRITI VISHAL SURANA
21 VII-G M-0343-07 DIKSHA DANNY MAHAJAN
22 VII-G N-1160-08 MALIHA REVANT DESAI
23 VII-G N-1157-08 POOJITA MUKUNDAN
24 VII-G G-0243-16 VANSHIKA CHETAN RAISA
25 VII-H M-0443-07 AAROHI BHAVESH SHAH
26 VII-H B-0194-11 ANURADHA SANDEEP SARAWAGI
27 VII-H M-0442-07 DISHA BHAVIN MISTRY
28 VII-H G-0246-16 KANAN SUNIL AGARWAL
29 VII-C M-0345-07 NIPEKSHA ANURAG SARAIYA

 

Participants List for Astronomy Camp on 29th December 2016

4th batch Participants List (Class-VII- DPS Surat) for the Astronomy Camp to be held at Delhi Public School Tapi on the night of 29th December 2016.

Class Name Admission No. Student Name
VII-F N-1032-08 DHRUV RAJKUMAR RATHOD
VII-G N-1129-08 DEVOTTAM MANISH LADDA
VII-E M-0387-07 DIPEN DEBASISH BASAK
VII-G M-0400-07 DEV DINESH GUPTA
VII-E M-0445-07 DHRUV MINESH PATEL
VII-G M-0446-07 ARYAN SUMIT AGRAWAL
VII-G N-1104-08 ANUJ PRAGNESH SHAH
VII-H M-0351-07 ANSH GAURAV BANSAL
VII-G N-1048-08 ANSH PRITESH PAREKH
VII-G M-0463-07 YUGAM ANURAG RAWAT
VII-H M-0474-07 SOHAM NIRMESH GANDHI
VII-E M-0383-07 ZEHAAN NILAY NAIK
VII-G M-0357-07 SHUBHAM PRAKASH MORE
VII-H E-0352-14 SAMAY ANISH GUPTA
VII-E M-0401-07 VYOM SHARAD SETH
VII-F N-1136-08 UMANG NAWAL BHAKKAR
VII-H M-0448-07 SAMARTH PRATHMESH VAKIL
VII-E N-1174-08 TUSHYA JAGDISH KUMAR PATEL
VII-H M-0480-07 RONIT AMIT BHAYANI
VII-D N-1171-08 ANIRUDH MADHUR GARG
VII-E N-1168-08 TIRTH RISHI PATEL
VII-H N-1172-08 RAYHAAN MOHAMED NOOR GENERAL
VII-F N-1080-08 PURAB RAJKUMAR JAIN
VII-E A-0260-10 SAINYAM JITENDRA ACHARYA
VII-H M-0437-07 PRATHAM VISHAL MASHRUWALA
VII-G M-0460-07 MOHIT PARESH MEVAWALA
VII-H G-0239-16 MOKSH VIPUL OSWAL
VII-E N-1140-08 PARVA ALOK INAMDAR
VII-F N-1166-08 NIRVAN UMANG ARORA
VII-E G-0245-16 PARTH KRISHNA AGRAWAL
VII-G N-1146-08 JASH ASHISH LALWALA
VII-H B-0202-11 KRISH NIMESH SHAH
VII-E N-1161-08 ADITYA GOPAL KEDIA
VII-E B-0190-11 PAARTH BHAGERIA
VII-H M-0365-07 KHUSH RAJIV KAPUR
VII-F M-0471-07 MANAV DEEPAK AGARWAL
VII-B M-0348-07 KRISH JAY NAIK
VII-E N-1170-08 MUAZZAM SHAIKH
VII-G N-1131-08 HARSHIT PRAMOD KAUNTIA
VII-E M-0396-07 MIT MEHUL PANWALA
VII-E M-0397-07 MAYANK VIJAY CHOPRA
VII-D A-0262-10 JAY NARESH JAIN
VII-E M-0338-07 MAHIT RAJESH GADHIWALA
VII-G B-0192-11 GAURAV ANIL NARANG
VII-G B-0188-11 DISHANT ANKUR PATEL
VII-H D-0306-13 HARSHIL SANJAY SINGHVI
VII-H N-1089-08 HARSH RAKESH JINDAL
VII-H N-1094-08 HARDIK HEMANT BHARTI

Astronomy camp held on 25th December : Glimpses

With a clear sky we had a great session and enjoyed learning about our Universe.

Participants List for Astronomy Camp on 25th December 2016

DELHI PUBLIC SCHOOL TAPI

3rd Batch participant list (Classes- 7 & 8-DPS Tapi) for Astronomy Camp on 25th December 2016 at DPS Tapi Campus.

SR NO ADM. NO STUDENT NAME CLASS/ SEC
1 A-0034-10 NIJAL CHANDRAKANT PANSURIA VII-A
2 A-0029-10 UMANG SHARMA VII-A
3 G-0026-16 DIYA MANISHBHAI DHAMELIYA VII-B
4 D-0032-13 JANAK SANJAYBHAI MEHTA VII-B
5 P-0010-09 LAVYA RAJEEV KAPOOR VII-B
6 D-0031-13 NEEL CHHABILAL PANDAY VII-B
7 A-0006-09 ARNAV ANURAG GAHLOT VIII-A
8 A-0001-09 AYUSH PRASHANTBHAI GOLWALA VIII-A
9 H-0011-16 DHRUMI MAYURDHWAJSINH VAGHELA VIII-A
10 A-0002-09 EKJYOT T.SINGH CHHABRA VIII-A
11 A-0004-09 ESHAAN R. JARIWALA VIII-A
12 A-0017-09 HARSHITKUMAR KIRANKUMAR SURATI VIII-A
13 A-0013-09 KEYA PRASHANT THAKER VIII-A
14 E-0049-13 KRISH KETANKUMAR SHAH VIII-A
15 E-0044-13 PALAK DINESH NICHANI VIII-A
16 E-0043-13 PANTHI KISHORBHAI PATEL VIII-A
17 A-0020-09 SEJAL SURENDAR MUNDHRA VIII-A
18 H-0009-16 TANMAY 0 PUROHIT VIII-A
19 B-0022-10 ZARA NEMAT KHAN VIII-A

 

 

Astronomy camps held on 4th & 5th December: Glimpses

Astronomy Camp on 5th December 2016-Participants

2nd batch Participants List (Class-VII- DPS Surat) for the Astronomy Camp to be held at Delhi Public School Tapi on the night of 5th December 2016.

Admission No. Student Name
A-0268-10 ANANYA VASHISTHA
N-1162-08 ARYA APURVA BHATT
E-0358-14 SHREYA VIPIN AGARWAL
N-1063-08 SARAH USMAAN CHINIWALA
M-0410-07 ANIKA VINAY KHANNA
E-0349-14 BHARTI BHARAT BHATIA
M-0336-07 DIYA RAJEEV PRADHAN
N-1076-08 JIA SUMESH JASUJA
M-0478-07 MANASVI VIKRAM SINGH
M-0417-07 NATANYA SAILESH CHOPRA
M-0418-07 RITAMBHARA PRATIK TRIVEDI
N-1154-08 SUDEEKSHA SAURABH MUKIM
N-1141-08 VRIDDHI RAJ KUMAR MEHTA
C-0292-12 CHHAVI PANKAJ KABRA
N-1164-08 MAHEK MUKESH AGARWAL
E-0347-14 SUHANEE KRUNAL PATEL
N-1143-08 KAIRAVI BIMAL UNARKAT
A-0263-10 KANISHA NILESH SHAH
N-1120-08 KHUSHBOO NIRMAL AGRAWAL
M-0384-07 PRISHA CHETANBHAI PATEL
M-0479-07 SANJANA ARUN BRAHMANKAR
F-0262-15 ANUSHRI PRANAV PANDIT
D-0304-13 ARCHI RAJESH AGARWAL
A-0267-10 SUHANI BENIGOPAL KALANTRI
N-1121-08 MAHEK NIRMAL AGRAWAL
N-1109-08 MARIA FIROZ GHADIALI
N-1078-08 PAHAL DHRUVIN PATEL
M-0402-07 TANISHA VISHAL BANSAL
M-0346-07 TANAYA RONAK SHAH
M-0469-07 URJA VIPUL SHAH

Astronomy Camp on 4th December 2016-Participants

1st batch Participants List (Class-VII- DPS Surat) for the Astronomy Camp to be held at Delhi Public School Tapi on the night of 4th December 2016.

Admission No. Student Name
A-0257-10 ANAND SASIKUMAR
M-0464-07 ARYAN PRADEEP ARORA
M-0334-07 HOMYAR CYRUS DOTIVALA
G-0240-16 AASHRAY KAMAL KAPADIA
M-0422-07 RISHI JIGNESHBHAI GHEEWALA
A-0265-10 SAI ARVINDBHAI MAKWANA
M-0360-07 ADITYA KAILASH LOHIYA
N-1060-08 FARSHAD RUSTOM KATPITIA
M-0470-07 SHREYAS SHARMA
M-0436-07 VANSH JAGATBHAI GANDHI
G-0241-16 VEDANT APURVA GANDHI
M-0339-07 AKHIL ALOK KHANDELWAL
D-0302-13 KARTAVYA GANESH KHAITAN
G-0255-16 MANN KHANDELWAL
M-0424-07 MOHNISH CHETAN DODHIA
B-0187-11 PRABUDDHA AMIT MALPANI
N-1042-08 UDYAM ANISH AGGRAWAL
A-0255-10 ARMAN MANISH SINHA
N-1150-08 ARYAN SANDEEP HURIA
B-0198-11 KRITIN SINGH
C-0294-12 NAVEEN AJITH NAIR
N-1049-08 VANSH SHYAM BINWANI
M-0472-07 ABHINAV RAJESH VATS
M-0375-07 AYUSH SUDHIR AGARWAL
D-0308-13 HARSH KIRAN MESHRAM
F-0257-15 LAKSH SHRIKANT GOYAL
N-1073-08 NISCHAL PRAVEEN AGARWAL
N-1085-08 SHRIDHAR SHYAM THARNARIWALA
M-0407-07 ABHISHEK SUBHASH PATEL
D-0309-13 ARSH TRIPATHI
M-0395-07 DEEP SHRAVANKUMAR AGARWAL
N-1069-08 DEVANSH SIDDHARTH MODI
G-0244-16 LAVYA RAJESH PUNJABI
N-1101-08 MEHZAAD PERCY VARIAVA
N-1081-08 NEIL YOGESHBHAI PATEL
N-1112-08 SWAYAM VIJAY GANGWANI
E-0355-14 TEJASV SRIVASTAVA
N-1134-08 VEER JINDAL
N-1132-08 CHAITANYA VIKAS GUPTA
E-0356-14 DEVRAJ JAYESH POOJARA
N-1155-08 YUVRAJ AMIT ARORA
M-0447-07 TEERTH RAJ RAMESH GONDALIA

 

What’s Up for December 2016

Join the Astronomy camps during December and January at our Astronomy Club at DPS Tapi. The first one for DPS Tapi Students of grades 4 & 5 was held last night. They saw the crescent Moon, Venus, Mars and the Andromeda Galaxy through the telescopes. They also identified many constellations and the Summer Triangle. Today we have the Grade 7 boys from DPS Surat who will spend the whole night at DPS Tapi with the stars and heavenly bodies.

See Mercury, Venus and Mars all month long and a New Year’s Eve comet. With some luck, you may catch some Geminid and Ursid meteors, too. This short clip is from NASA JPL.

What’s Up for November 2016

This month, learn where and when to look for Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. Plus, more meteor showers to enjoy!

 

What’s Up for October?

What’s Up for October? Moon phases- Observe the Moon night and three meteor showers. Watch this video to get sky maps showing where and when to look.

What’s Up for September 2016

What’s up in the sky this month? An eclipse in Africa, two minor meteor showers, and planet and moon pair-ups. Plus: Get information now to help plan for the August 2017 total solar eclipse, which will span the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Dunes of Shangri-La on Saturn’s Moon Titan

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has radar vision that allows it to peer through the haze that surrounds Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. This video focuses on Shangri-la, a large, dark area on Titan filled with dunes. The long, linear dunes are thought to be comprised of grains derived from hydrocarbons that have settled out of Titan’s atmosphere. Cassini has shown that dunes of this sort encircle most of Titan’s equator. Scientists can use the dunes to learn about winds, the sands they’re composed of, and highs and lows in the landscape.

The radar image was obtained by the Cassini Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) on July 25, 2016, during the mission’s 122nd targeted Titan encounter.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini.

What’s Up for August 2016

The Making of a Satellite : Inside ISRO

Hubble image of the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

hs-2016-26-a-web

ABOUT THIS IMAGE:
Peering deep into the core of the Crab Nebula, this close-up image reveals the beating heart of one of the most historic and intensively studied remnants of a supernova, an exploding star. The inner region sends out clock-like pulses of radiation and tsunamis of charged particles embedded in magnetic fields.

The neutron star at the very center of the Crab Nebula has about the same mass as the sun but compressed into an incredibly dense sphere that is only a few miles across. Spinning 30 times a second, the neutron star shoots out detectable beams of energy that make it look like it’s pulsating.

The NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot is centered on the region around the neutron star (the rightmost of the two bright stars near the center of this image) and the expanding, tattered, filamentary debris surrounding it. Hubble’s sharp view captures the intricate details of glowing gas, shown in red, that forms a swirling medley of cavities and filaments. Inside this shell is a ghostly blue glow that is radiation given off by electrons spiraling at nearly the speed of light in the powerful magnetic field around the crushed stellar core.

The neutron star is a showcase for extreme physical processes and unimaginable cosmic violence. Bright wisps are moving outward from the neutron star at half the speed of light to form an expanding ring. It is thought that these wisps originate from a shock wave that turns the high-speed wind from the neutron star into extremely energetic particles.

When this “heartbeat” radiation signature was first discovered in 1968, astronomers realized they had discovered a new type of astronomical object. Now astronomers know it’s the archetype of a class of supernova remnants called pulsars — or rapidly spinning neutron stars. These interstellar “lighthouse beacons” are invaluable for doing observational experiments on a variety of astronomical phenomena, including measuring gravity waves.

Observations of the Crab supernova were recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1054 A.D. The nebula, bright enough to be visible in amateur telescopes, is located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Taurus.

New Crew Launches to the International Space Station

Expedition 48-49 Soyuz Commander Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Kate Rubins of NASA and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft July 7 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-month mission.

Juno’s Status at Jupiter

On July 5, just hours after NASA’s Juno spacecraft arrived at the planet Jupiter, NASA held a press briefing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California to provide a status update on the spacecraft. Juno’s arrival at our solar system’s most massive planet was the culmination of a nearly five-year journey through space. The spacecraft will be the first to orbit the poles of Jupiter –on a mission to provide new answers to ongoing mysteries about the planet’s core, composition and magnetic fields, as well as clues about the origins of our solar system.

Hello Jupiter! The Juno Mission

On July 4th, NASA Television aired live coverage of the solar-powered Juno spacecraft’s arrival at Jupiter after an almost five-year journey. Juno is the first spacecraft to orbit the poles of our solar system’s most massive planet. It will circle the Jovian world 37 times during 20 months, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the cloud tops, providing new answers to ongoing mysteries about the planet’s core, composition and magnetic fields.

What’s Up for July 2016

Use Saturn as your guide to a tour of the summer Milky Way. Spot planets, constellations, nebulae and galaxies.

Taking INDIA TO MARS! The story behind India’s space program | Ritu Karidhal

Taking INDIA TO MARS! The story behind India’s space program | Ritu Karidhal
“Have confidence in your capability without giving your gender much thought. Be focussed on your goal and work with complete dedication.”
Ritu Karidhal is a proud contributor to The Mars Orbiter Mission launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation. Leading the team behind the success of ‘Mangalyaan’, Ritu has been involved in a lot of revolutionary space operations with ISRO. A proficient alumnus of the Indian Institute of Science, she completed her Masters in Aerospace Engineering with a clear aim of working towards a change. She comes from a middle class family , in Lucknow, where the major importance has always been given to the education . She always had the fascination about space , an urge to do something different from a normal trend . Collecting news articles related to any space activities by ISRO or NASA was one of her hobbies.The dream of joining the space agency came true in 1997,November .She has worked for many prestigious missions of ISRO , handled responsible position of Operations Director for many missions.

What happened at the Big Bang?

This short video from the Royal Society explains What happened at the Big Bang. An ancient glow is shedding light on the beginning of the universe. There is a faint glow of ancient light that permeates our universe, called the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Findings from the Planck space mission to detect variations in the CMB, reveals how they’re helping us to understand what happened in the first instants after the Big Bang.