Category Archives: Night Sky

What’s Up for January 2015 by NASA’s JPL

Jupiter’s moons are putting on an amazing show this month. The orbital path of the moons is tilting edge-on to Earth and the sun. This lineup makes it possible to watch the moons pass in front of each other and even eclipse each other with their shadows. Get all the details, including where to find Jupiter in the sky this month, in this edition of What’s Up.

Glimpses of the Astro camps so far this year by the DPS Astronomy Club.

Basics of Astronomy: What are Binary Stars?

All those who have attended the Astronomy Camp at DPS Tapi have seen many stars and constellations. If you remember I had shown you one star in the Constellation Perseus called Algol. Algol is a binary star. Learn more about Binary stars in this video from Kurdistan Planetarium.

Third Batch of participants from Class VI and VII of DPS Tapi for the Astro Camp on 20th December 2014.

Third Batch of participants from Class VI and VII of DPS Tapi for the night long Astro Camp on 20th December 2014 to be held at DPS Tapi at Nathan Village. The Astronomy club of DPS welcomes all participants and looks forward to clear skies tonight.

DPS TAPI PARTICIPANTS FOR ASTRONOMY CAMP ON 20TH DECEMBER 2014

FRIDAY 19/12/2014
Sr. No Admin No. Names Class & Sec M/F
1 B-0023-10 ALEMA RIYAZ POTHIAWALA VI A F
2 A-0006-09 ARNAV ANURAG GAHLOT VI A M
3 A-0001-09 AYUSH PRASHANTBHAI GOLWALA VI A M
4 A-0005-09 DHRITI DEVANG NAIK VI A F
5 A-0002-09 EKJYOT T.SINGH CHHABRA VI A M
6 A-0004-09 ESHAAN R. JARIWALA VI A M
7 A-0017-09 HARSHIT K. SURATI VI A M
8 D-0025-12 JYOTSANA UPENDRA SHARMA VI A F
9 A-0013-09 KEYA PRASHANT THAKER VI A F
10 A-0003-09 KUNWARDEEP G.SINGH CHHABRA VI A M
11 E-0045-13 MALAY PRASHANT TAMAKUWALA VI A M
12 A-0015-09 NIMIT NITIN GARG VI A M
13 E-0044-13 PALAK DINESH NICHANI VI A F
14 E-0043-13 PANTHI KISHORBHAI PATEL VI A F
15 A-0025-09 PRAPTI DARSHAN SHAH VI A F
16 D-0026-12 RISHABH   RAMNATH VI A M
17 C-0025-11 SAJAY SAJEEV EZHAVA VI A M
18 A-0020-09 SEJAL SURENDAR MUNDHRA VI A F
19 D-0027-12 SHIA NOVROZBHAI SURANI VI A F
20 B-0025-10 SHOUBHIK   DEB VI A M
21 C-0023-11 SHREY JITENDRA MANCHANDA VI A M
22 C-0030-11 STUTI SHAILESH PATEL VI A F
23 B-0022-10 ZARA NEMAT KHAN VI A F
24 B-0014-09 ABHINAV GULSHAN CHAWLA VII – A M
25 C-0017-10 AISHA SURESH BHAI ROY VII – A F
26 G-0019-14 BEEPASHA JIGNESH MADHWANI VII – A F
27 C-0015-10 ESHAN RAKESH GARG VII – A M
28 D-0024-11 EVA HANIF NATHANI VII – A F
29 C-0018-10 G. PURUSHOATH   – VII – A M
30 B-0015-09 KHUSHI SAMIR SHAH VII – A F
31 B-0016-09 MOHAMMAD UZAIR SUHEL HUNANI VII – A M
32 C-0016-10 PRANAV KRISHAN BHOOT VII – A M
33 F-0020-13 SACHI CHIRAG SHAH VII – A F
34 B-0017-09 SANSKRITI   BARMAN VII – A F
35 B-0003-09 SHIVANG AMIT VIJ VII – A M
36 F-0024-13 SIDDHARTH   PIRUKA VII – A M
37 D-0019-11 AQSA SAJID KAPADIA VII – A F
38 E-0038-12 ZENIL BAKULESHKUMAR CHAUDHARI VII – A M
39 A-0010-09 ARYAN ANILKUMAR AGARWAL VI A M
40 A-0012-09 HEET JAYESH SOJITRA VI A M
41 A-0023-09 HONEY MAHENDRA TANNA VI A F
42 A-0008-09 MANSI VINOD KUMAR BHATIA VI A F
43 F-0025-14 MIT ASHOK KHENI VI A M
44 C-0027-11 SAMYAK DIVYESHBHAI SHAH VI A M
45 E-0048-13 SANKET RAMESH KUSHWAHA VI A M
46 A-0027-09 YASH SANDEEP CHIRANIA VI A M
47 E-0046-13 YASH VIJAYBHAI DHANANI VI A M
48 E-0049-13 KRISH KETANKUMAR SHAH VI A M
49 C-0002-09 KARTIKEN R. BARNWAL VIII – A M
50 B-0002-09 ADDYA   KHEMKA VII – A F
51 D-0018-11 LAY JIGAR NAIK VII – A M

First Batch of participants of the Astro Camp 2014-15 at DPS Tapi on 18th December 2014

We are happy to welcome the first batch of participants from Class VI of DPS Surat for the Astronomy Camp on the 18th of December 2014 to be held at our Astronomy Club venue at DPS Tapi at Narthan Patia. We hope all the participants get connected to the beautiful night sky.

SNO. ADM NO. NAME CLASS
1 N-0955-07 VIDHI KHADARIA VI-A
2 M-0266-06 BHUMIKA VIMAL AGARWAL VI-B
3 M-0222-06 KRISHA MANOJ CHHEDA VI-B
4 M-0324-06 MADHVI PARMESHWAR LAL SHARMA VI-B
5 M-0241-06 VIHAA TEJAAS KAPADIA VI-B
6 C-0274-11 VRITEE YOGESHBHAI RABADIA VI-B
7 N-0990-07 HRIDA MIHIR SHUKLA VI-C
8 N-0879-07 MAHEK HARSUKH KORAT VI-C
9 N-0887-07 RASHI CHETAN JUNEJA VI-C
10 M-0302-06 AAISHANI NAILESHBHAI ANMI VI-D
11 M-0316-06 KANISHKA SOHAM DESAI VI-D
12 M-0291-06 DIYA PRAKASH PATEL VI-F
13 E-0335-13 KHUSHI KIRAN MESHRAM VI-F
14 M-0257-06 MUSKAN RAJIV ARORA VI-F
15 N-0896-07 RIA VIKAS AHUJA VI-F
16 M-0320-06 RIDDHI AJAY MARU VI-F
17 N-0950-07 SAAMYA JIMMY PATEL VI-G
18 N-0906-07 KIRTI SUMIR KINRA VI-H
19 N-0920-07 MUDIT SURANA VI-A
20 B-0185-10 SANYAM S JAIN VI-A
21 N-0853-07 ADHYAN HIRENBHAI PATEL VI-B
22 N-0938-07 AMAN BHAVIN BHAVSAR VI-B
23 M-0274-06 NIYANT YASHESH SHUKLA VI-B
24 N-1015-07 SHIV CHETAN SHAH VI-B
25 C-0268-11 VANSH MUKESH JAIN VI-B
26 P-0212-08 ANIKET BHATTACHARYA VI-C
27 A-0238-09 ANIRUDH SINGH RAUTELA VI-D
28 C-0278-11 MUSTAFA DURIYA SAIFEE VI-D
29 N-1010-07 SHLOAK NITIN KARIWALA VI-D
30 C-0267-11 TAHA JUZER SAIFEE VI-D
31 M-0239-06 DHARMIT DIVYESH CHEVLI VI-E
32 N-0911-07 OM PARESH CHOKSI VI-E
33 N-0989-07 SHUBHAM AJAY JAIN VI-E
34 N-0851-07 DEVARSHI PRAKASHKUMAR PATEL VI-F
35 N-1013-07 SURYANSH JAGDISH SABOO VI-F
36 N-0931-07 KABIR KAPIL ARORA VI-G
37 M-0321-06 MUDIT VIKAS MODI VI-G
38 N-0962-07 SHUBH ARCHISHKUMAR DESAI VI-G
39 N-0914-07 KAUSHIK AGARWAL VI-H

LIGHT POLLUTION IN ASTRONOMY-Documentary

Embers from a Rock Comet: The 2014 Geminid Meteor Shower

What’s Up for December 2014 from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab

Star Walk 2 & Star Walk Kids – Tutorial

Star Walk 2 and Star Walk Kids are two apps that we know you’re going to love. In this tutorial video, David will demo both Apps and show off their in app purchase features. It’s a fantastic app that inspires creativity by allowing you (and your kids) to explore the universe like never before. If you only buy one Astronomy App, check out Star Walk 2.

The Biggest Stars In The Universe

The details in this video are as of 2009. I have posted it only for you to compare the sizes and get an idea of scale. The largest star identified as of now is  UY Scuti. Click here for the complete list from Wikipedia.

VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) is a red hypergiant star located in the constellation Canis Major. With a size of 2600 solar radii, it is the largest known star and also one of the most luminous known. It is located about 1.5 kiloparsecs (4.6×1016 km) or about 4,900 light years away from Earth. Unlike most stars, which occur in either binary or multiple star systems, VY CMa is a single star. It is categorized as a semiregular variable and has an estimated period of 6,275,081 days, or just under 17,200 years.

Antares is a red supergiant star in the Milky Way galaxy and the sixteenth brightest star in the nighttime sky (sometimes listed as fifteenth brightest, if the two brighter components of the Capella quadruple star system are counted as one star). Along with Aldebaran, Spica, and Regulus it is one of the four brightest stars near the ecliptic. Antares is a variable star, whose apparent magnitude varies from +0.9 to +1.8.

The Pistol Star is a blue hypergiant and is one of the most luminous known stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. It is one of many massive young stars in the Quintuplet cluster in the Galactic Center region. The star owes its name to the shape of the Pistol Nebula, which it illuminates. It is located approximately 25,000 light years from Earth in the direction of Sagittarius. It would be visible to the naked eye as a fourth magnitude star, if it were not for the interstellar dust that completely hides it from view in visible light.

Rigel (β Ori / β Orionis / Beta Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the sixth brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0.18. Although it has the Bayer designation “beta”, it is almost always brighter than Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse).

Aldebaran (α Tau, α Tauri, Alpha Tauri) is an orange giant star located about 65 light years away in the zodiac constellation of Taurus. With an average apparent magnitude of 0.87 it is the brightest star in the constellation and is one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. The name Aldebaran is Arabic (الدبران al-dabarān) and translates literally as “the follower”, presumably because this bright star appears to follow the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters star cluster in the night sky. This star is also called the Bull’s Eye because of its striking orange color and its location in the bull’s head shaped asterism. NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which flew by Jupiter in 1973, is currently traveling in the direction and will reach it in about two million years.

Arcturus (α Boo / α Boötis / Alpha Boötis) is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. With a visual magnitude of −0.05, it is also the third brightest star in the night sky, after Sirius and Canopus. It is, however, fainter than the combined light of the two main components of Alpha Centauri, which are too close together for the eye to resolve as separate sources of light, making Arcturus appear to be the fourth brightest. It is the second brightest star visible from northern latitudes and the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere. The star is in the Local Interstellar Cloud.

Pollux (β Gem / β Geminorum / Beta Geminorum) is an orange giant star approximately 34 light-years from the Earth in the constellation of Gemini (the Twins). Pollux is the brightest star in the constellation, brighter than Castor (Alpha Geminorum). As of 2006, Pollux was confirmed to have an extrasolar planet orbiting it.

Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, it is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. The name Sirius is derived from the Ancient Greek Σείριος. The star has the Bayer designation α Canis Majoris (α CMa, or Alpha Canis Majoris). What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B.

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System. The Sun has a diameter of about 1,392,000 kilometres (865,000 mi) (about 109 Earths), and by itself accounts for about 99.86% of the Solar System’s mass; the remainder consists of the planets (including Earth), asteroids, meteoroids, comets, and dust in orbit. About three-fourths of the Sun’s mass consists of hydrogen, while most of the rest is helium.

What’s Up for October 2014 – from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab

Night Sky on 22nd September from Surat

The Sky tonight – 19th September 2014 by G.R.Sivakumar

What’s Up for September 2014- From NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab