Category Archives: Videos

What’s Up for December 2017

What’s Up for December?  The Night Sky from NASA JPL. The best meteor shower of the year and brightest stars! See where and when to look.

Five Years of Curiosity on Mars

Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today. The rover currently is climbing through the foothills of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mountain formed from sediment brought in by water and wind. This talk will cover the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.

Speakers:
James K. Erickson, Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager, JPL
Ashwin R. Vasavada, Mars Science Laboratory Project Scientist, JPL

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Streamed live on 13 Jul 2017

A Journey to Alpha Centauri – Christian Marois (SETI Talks 2017)

he Alpha Centauri star system is ideal to search for habitable planets by various observing techniques due to its proximity and wide range of stellar masses. Following the recent discovery of an Earth-size planet candidate located inside the Proxima Centauri habitable zone, Dr. Marois will discuss this remarkable discovery and the planet’s potential to find life. He will also present our current instrument project for the Gemini South observatory, TIKI, to discover similar planets around the two Sun-like pair located 15,000 AU from Proxima Centauri. The Alpha Centauri system is the prime target of the Breakthrough Starshot program, a project to send small quarter-size probes to take resolve images of these new worlds, and to prepare for Humanity’s first step into a new star system.

Dr Marois completed his Ph.D. at the Université de Montréal in 2004. The main topic of his thesis work was to understand the limits in exoplanet imaging and to design innovating observing strategies. After his thesis, he did postdoctoral researches at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of California Berkeley and NRC. In 2008, while at NRC, he led the team that took the first image of another planetary system (HR 8799) using the Keck and Gemini telescopes. He is currently pursuing his research at the NRC Herzberg where he is part of the Gemini Planet Imager campaign, and leading the development of instruments for imaging Earth-like planets at Gemini South and at the TMT.

What’s Up for September 2016

What’s up in the sky this month? An eclipse in Africa, two minor meteor showers, and planet and moon pair-ups. Plus: Get information now to help plan for the August 2017 total solar eclipse, which will span the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

The Making of a Satellite : Inside ISRO

New Crew Launches to the International Space Station

Expedition 48-49 Soyuz Commander Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Kate Rubins of NASA and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft July 7 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-month mission.

What’s Up For May 2016

What can you see in the sky this month? Mercury transits the sun and Mars is closer to Earth than it has been in 11 years. Watch to learn how and where to look for them.

The most mysterious star in the universe : TED Talk by Tabetha Boyajian

What’s Up on the Space Station?

Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 47 Commander Tim Kopra of NASA and Flight Engineers Jeff Williams of NASA and Tim Peake of ESA (European Space Agency) discussed life and research on the orbital outpost during a pair of in-flight interviews March 22 with online technology media outlets Gizmodo and The Verge. Williams arrived on the station on March 19 for a six-month mission, his record-breaking third long duration flight on the complex. Kopra and Peake are more than halfway through their six-month stay on the station.

Expedition 47 48 Crew Docks to the Space Station

After launching earlier in their Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 47-48 Soyuz Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos and Jeff Williams of NASA arrived at the International Space Station on Mar. 19. The new crewmembers will join station Commander Tim Kopra of NASA and Flight Engineers Yuri Malenchenko of Roscosmos and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency, already onboard the station.

Gravitational Waves detected by LIGO

Start the video at 27:14 mins to see the actual announcement and explanation from LIGO.
Historic announcement from LIGO. Gravitational waves detected by LIGO. Einstein was right!!

LIGO detects gravitational waves **Begin viewing at 27:14**

Flight Over Dwarf Planet Ceres

Take a flight over dwarf planet Ceres in this video made with images from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. The simulated flyover was made by the mission’s camera team at Germany’s national aeronautics and space research center (DLR).

Light Pollution in Astronomy

Documentary on Light Pollution. Light Pollution and Astronomy : The night Sky is beautiful and all our children deserve to see them in all their glory.

What is Dark Matter?

What is Dark Matter?  – Space Documentary
By fitting a theoretical model of the composition of the Universe to the combined set of cosmological observations, scientists have come up with the composition that we described above, ~68% dark energy, ~27% dark matter, ~5% normal matter. What is dark matter?
We are much more certain what dark matter is not than we are what it is. First, it is dark, meaning that it is not in the form of stars and planets that we see. Observations show that there is far too little visible matter in the Universe to make up the 27% required by the observations. Second, it is not in the form of dark clouds of normal matter, matter made up of particles called baryons. We know this because we would be able to detect baryonic clouds by their absorption of radiation passing through them. Third, dark matter is not antimatter, because we do not see the unique gamma rays that are produced when antimatter annihilates with matter. Finally, we can rule out large galaxy-sized black holes on the basis of how many gravitational lenses we see. High concentrations of matter bend light passing near them from objects further away, but we do not see enough lensing events to suggest that such objects to make up the required 25% dark matter contribution.

What is Space Made of?

What is space? What is Space Made of ? If you ignore the galaxies, stars & atoms, then the rest of empty space is mysterious. It is really not nothing. See this documentary to know more.

How the Moon was Formed

Most scientists believe the Moon’s formation resulted from a giant impact between the Earth and a mysterious object called Theia.

ESO : Their telescopes and the Universe

Europe to the Stars : The European Southern Observatory’s (ESO) first 50 years of exploring the southern sky.

Quasars: the Brightest Black Holes

Quasars: the Brightest Black Holes – Lecture by Professor Carolin Crawford

Quasars are among the most dramatic objects anywhere in the cosmos. They emit prodigious amounts of energy, all due to a supermassive black hole at the heart of a galaxy. Visible far across the Universe, quasars can be used to trace both the early life of galaxies, and the properties of the intervening space.

Close Encounter with Enceladus

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft is about to make a daring plunge through one of the plumes emerging from Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

The human eye – a user guide for astronomers

What’s Up for October 2015

To celebrate the 100th episode of What’s Up, here are the top ten favorite celestial targets you can view this month from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Supermoon Lunar Eclipse on Sunday the 27th of September 2015

On September 27th, 2015 there will be a very rare event in the night sky – a Supermoon Lunar Eclipse. Watch this animated feature from NASA to learn more.

“Comet, Asteroid and Planetary Collisions” -Documentary

What’s Up in the Night Sky for September 2015

This new telescope might show us the beginning of the universe: Wendy Freedman

When and how did the universe begin? A global group of astronomers wants to answer that question by peering as far back in time as a large new telescope will let us see. Wendy Freedman headed the creation of the Giant Magellan Telescope, under construction in South America; at TEDGlobal in Rio, she shares a bold vision of the discoveries about our universe that the GMT could make possible.

Curiosity Rover Report (August 2015): Three Years on Mars!

After three action-packed years on Mars, the Curiosity rover is ready to take on higher slopes of Mount Sharp.

Saturn’s Rings: An Accessible Astrophysical Disk – Matthew Tiscareno (SETI Talks)

Saturn’s ring system is an astrophysical disk that is neither light-years away nor billions of years in the past. We can visit this disk at close range and observe a number of phenomena that also operate in disks of other kinds. As a result, we see small-scale processes that shape ring texture, connect those processes to the bodies and structures that cause them, and watch closely as the disk changes with time.

We will discuss recent Cassini observations that elucidate disk processes including 1) “self-gravity wakes” and “spiral density waves,” both of which were originally proposed for galaxies but are observed with exquisite precision in Saturn’s rings, 2) “propeller” features caused by 100-meter to km-sized moonlets embedded in the disk; these are the first objects ever to have their orbits tracked while embedded in a disk, rather than orbiting in free space, and hold the potential of deepening our understanding of planetary migration, and 3) irregular edge shapes in the gaps opened up by larger moons (10 km and more), which may hold clues to angular momentum transport.

What’s New in Aerospace? Meet an Astronaut: Reid Wiseman

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman or otherwise known as @Astro_Reid recounts his launch into space on a Soyuz rocket and his stay on board the International Space Station as a member of Expedition 40/41 from the Moving Beyond Earth Gallery at the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum. During his 165 days in space, took all of us back on Earth along for the journey. An active Twitter user, Wiseman posted amazing images and videos from space, using the hashtag #EarthArt for many of his amazing shots of our beautiful planet.

“Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth” – Breathtaking Time-Lapse Video of Earth From Space

Using footage from NASA’s Johnson Space Center, filmmaker Fede Castro creates a captivating time-lapse video of Earth from space. In a little over four minutes, “Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth” takes us around the world, sighting major cities and even catching the breathtaking aurora borealis.
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos selected by National Geographic’s editors.

The Pluto Files – Documentary with Neil Degrasse Tyson