Category Archives: Videos

“Comet, Asteroid and Planetary Collisions” -Documentary

What’s Up in the Night Sky for September 2015

This new telescope might show us the beginning of the universe: Wendy Freedman

When and how did the universe begin? A global group of astronomers wants to answer that question by peering as far back in time as a large new telescope will let us see. Wendy Freedman headed the creation of the Giant Magellan Telescope, under construction in South America; at TEDGlobal in Rio, she shares a bold vision of the discoveries about our universe that the GMT could make possible.

Curiosity Rover Report (August 2015): Three Years on Mars!

After three action-packed years on Mars, the Curiosity rover is ready to take on higher slopes of Mount Sharp.

Saturn’s Rings: An Accessible Astrophysical Disk – Matthew Tiscareno (SETI Talks)

Saturn’s ring system is an astrophysical disk that is neither light-years away nor billions of years in the past. We can visit this disk at close range and observe a number of phenomena that also operate in disks of other kinds. As a result, we see small-scale processes that shape ring texture, connect those processes to the bodies and structures that cause them, and watch closely as the disk changes with time.

We will discuss recent Cassini observations that elucidate disk processes including 1) “self-gravity wakes” and “spiral density waves,” both of which were originally proposed for galaxies but are observed with exquisite precision in Saturn’s rings, 2) “propeller” features caused by 100-meter to km-sized moonlets embedded in the disk; these are the first objects ever to have their orbits tracked while embedded in a disk, rather than orbiting in free space, and hold the potential of deepening our understanding of planetary migration, and 3) irregular edge shapes in the gaps opened up by larger moons (10 km and more), which may hold clues to angular momentum transport.

What’s New in Aerospace? Meet an Astronaut: Reid Wiseman

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman or otherwise known as @Astro_Reid recounts his launch into space on a Soyuz rocket and his stay on board the International Space Station as a member of Expedition 40/41 from the Moving Beyond Earth Gallery at the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum. During his 165 days in space, took all of us back on Earth along for the journey. An active Twitter user, Wiseman posted amazing images and videos from space, using the hashtag #EarthArt for many of his amazing shots of our beautiful planet.

“Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth” – Breathtaking Time-Lapse Video of Earth From Space

Using footage from NASA’s Johnson Space Center, filmmaker Fede Castro creates a captivating time-lapse video of Earth from space. In a little over four minutes, “Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth” takes us around the world, sighting major cities and even catching the breathtaking aurora borealis.
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos selected by National Geographic’s editors.

The Pluto Files – Documentary with Neil Degrasse Tyson

Pluto and Beyond – The Story of Pluto – Documentary

Asteroids and Meteors – Documentary

What’s Up for May 2015

Venus and Mercury grace the west-northwest sky an hour past sunset while the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn rule the sky this month.

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The Ever Expanding Universe

Shadow of the Moon | NASA

On March 20th, 2015, the Moon’s shadow will create a total solar eclipse. This video presents several visualizations of what this shadow would look like from space, and highlights the areas of the world in the path of the umbra and penumbra. The visualizations were created by calculating the position of the Earth, Moon, and Sun on this date, and by using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter global photo mosaics and elevation maps.

Super Moon Solar Eclipse on March 20,2015

India in Space-Documentary

‘India in Space’ records the birth and progress of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) and India’s contribution in the area of space research. The firing of a two-stage rocket from a Kerala fishing village saw the birth of the Indian Space Programme and India’s entry into the ‘space age’. ISRO was formed by the vision of Dr. Vikram Sarabhai with a clear objective of peaceful exploration of space. The Satellite Instructional and Television Experiment or SITE using the U.S. Satellite ATS- 6 saw the telecast of a series of educational programs on health, family planning, agriculture in over two thousand five hundred villages. The next few decades saw the tremendous success of India in launching satellites through its own satellites systems, primarily for telecommunications designed and built by ISRO called INSAT.

NASA Documentary – Pioneer 10 Jupiter Odyssey

On this day (2nd March) in 1972 Pioneer 10 was launched towards Jupiter. Pioneer 10 is an American space probe, that completed the first mission to the planet Jupiter. Thereafter, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to achieve escape velocity from the Solar System.

Reflections on the Pale Blue Dot by Ann Druyan

Ann Druyan, Carl Sagan’s co-author and widow, reflects on the meaning of Voyager’s “pale blue dot” image of Earth.For more information about the iconic photo taken Feb. 14, 1990, visit http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/cata… and http://go.nasa.gov/1vrTaRo .

Latest News from NASA about progress of James Webb Space Telescope

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Senator Barbara Mikulski of Maryland participated in a news conference Feb. 3 at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to discuss the status of the agency’s flagship science project, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Bolden and Mikulski congratulated the JWST team for the integration at Goddard of all the telescope’s flight instruments and primary mirrors.
The most powerful space telescope ever built, Webb will be the premiere observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. It will study every phase in the history of our universe, including the first luminous glows after the big bang, the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets similar to Earth, and the evolution of our own solar system.

Hubble eXtreme Deep Field – Farthest Ever View of the Universe

Hubble goes to the eXtreme to assemble farthest ever view of the Universe. Hubble eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) pushes back the frontiers of time and space.This video explains how astronomers meticulously assembled mankind’s deepest view of the universe from combining Hubble Space Telescope exposures taken over the past decade. Guest scientists are Dr. Garth Illingworth and Dr. Marc Postman.

The Andromeda Galaxy (M-31) image: The largest NASA Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled.

The largest NASA Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled, this sweeping view of a portion of M31 (Andromeda galaxy) is the sharpest large composite image ever taken of our galactic neighbour. Though the galaxy is over 2 million light-years away, the Hubble telescope is powerful enough to resolve individual stars in a 61,000-light-year-long section of the galaxy’s pancake-shaped disk. It’s like photographing a beach and resolving individual grains of sand. And, there are lots of stars in this sweeping view — over 100 million, with some of them in thousands of star clusters seen embedded in the disk. This ambitious photographic cartography of the Andromeda galaxy represents a new benchmark for precision studies of large spiral galaxies which dominate the universe’s population of over 100 billion galaxies. Never before have astronomers been able to see individual stars over a major portion of an external spiral galaxy. Most of the stars in the universe live inside such majestic star cities, and this is the first data that reveal populations of stars in context to their home galaxy. The panorama is the product of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program. Images were obtained from viewing the galaxy in near-ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 aboard Hubble. This view shows the galaxy in its natural visible-light color, as photographed with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys in red and blue filters July 2010 through October 2013.

HUBBLE : 15 years of Discovery

The story of the Hubble Telescope by ESA.

Gamma Ray Bursts and Black holes

During the Astro Camp some of you had queries regarding Gamma Ray Bursts and also about hyper novae and black holes. Watch this documentary to give you more info on this.

It was one of the greatest mysteries in modern science: a series of brief but extremely bright flashes of ultra-high energy light coming from somewhere out in space. These gamma ray bursts were first spotted by spy satellites in the 1960s. It took three decades and a revolution in high-energy astronomy for scientists to figure out what they were.

Basics of Astronomy: What are Binary Stars?

All those who have attended the Astronomy Camp at DPS Tapi have seen many stars and constellations. If you remember I had shown you one star in the Constellation Perseus called Algol. Algol is a binary star. Learn more about Binary stars in this video from Kurdistan Planetarium.

Landing On A Comet – Rosetta Mission 2014 New Details

Cosmic Journeys – Voyager Journey to the Stars

Cosmic Journeys examines the great promise of the Voyager mission and where it will lead us in our grand ambition to move out beyond our home planet. The two Voyager spacecraft are part of an ancient quest to push beyond our boundaries… to see what lies beyond the horizon. Now tens of billions of kilometers from Earth, two spacecraft are streaking out into the void. What will we learn about the Galaxy, the Universe, and ourselves from Voyager’s epic Journey to the stars? December 19, 1972… the splashdown of the Apollo 17 crew capsule marked the end of the golden age of manned spaceflight. The Mercury…. Gemini… and Apollo programs had proven that we could send people into space… To orbit the Earth…. Fly out beyond our planet… Then land on the moon and walk among its ancient crater. The collective will to send people beyond our planet faded in times of economic uncertainty, war, and shifting priorities. And yet, just five years after Apollo ended, scientists launched a new vision that was just as profound and even more far-reaching.

It didn’t all go smoothly. Early computer problems threatened to doom Voyager 2. Then its radio receiver failed, forcing engineers to use a back up. Now, after more than three and a half decades of successful operations, the twin spacecraft are sending back information on their flight into interstellar space. Along the way, they have revealed a solar system rich beyond our imagining.
The journey was made possible by a rare alignment of the planets, a configuration that occurs only once every 176 years. That enabled the craft to go from planet to planet, accelerating as they entered the gravitational field of one, then flying out to the next. The Voyagers carried a battery of scientific equipment to collect data on the unknown worlds in their path. That included a pair of vidicom cameras, and a data transfer rate slower than a dialup modem.

Cosmic Journeys – Birth of the Moon

Scientists have been reconstructing the history of the moon by scouring its surface, mapping its mountains and craters, and probing its interior. What are they learning about our own planet’s beginnings? Decades ago, we sent astronauts to the moon as a symbol of confidence in the face of the great cold war struggle. Landing on the moon was a giant leap for mankind. But it’s what the astronauts picked up from the lunar surface that may turn out to be Apollo’s greatest legacy.

When the astronauts of Apollo stepped out of their landing craft, they entered a world draped in fine sticky dust, strewn with rocks, and pocked with craters. They walked and rambled about, picking up rocks that they packed for the return flight. Back in earth-bound labs, scientists went to work probing the rocks for clues to one of the most vexing questions in all of science. Where did the moon come from? The answer promised to shed light on an even grander question. Where did Earth come from? And how did it evolve into the planet we know today?

The nature of the moon began to come into focus four centuries ago. Galileo Galilei had heard of an instrument built by Dutch opticians capable of “seeing faraway things as though nearby.” Galileo, in many ways the first modern scientist, saw this new instrument as a tool to help settle a long standing question. What was the nature of the heavens, and how did the world of men fit within it? To some philosophers, the moon was a perfect, crystalline sphere of divine substance, free of Earth’s imperfections. Galileo, with his telescope, saw a more familiar reality. He noted mountains and valleys on the moon, features like those of Earth.

The astronauts of Apollo lifted off on a series of missions to get a close up look at the moon and perhaps settle the debate. Because there’s no atmosphere there, the astronauts entered landscapes that are nearly frozen in time. They could scour the lunar surface for evidence of events going back almost to the time of its birth.
Indeed, eons of impacts had opened up the Moon’s interior, leaving a wealth of information strewn about their landing sites. Scientists had already noticed that some large old craters were surrounded by concentric rings. You can see one of the most pronounced examples in this image of the Mare Orientale, captured recently by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO. The colors show differences in elevation.

The old view was that the impact had melted the rock below. A newer view held that the impactor had actually splashed down on a molten surface. That gave rise to the radical notion that, early in its history, the moon’s surface was covered in a vast ocean of magma. When the astronauts arrived, they found relatively light rocks known as anorthosites. Their presence suggested that heavier material had sunk toward the moon’s interior, forcing lighter material to the surface. The rocks they brought back were found to be strikingly similar to those on Earth, in part because they share forms of oxygen, called isotopes, that scientists regard as “blood types” for solar system bodies. Then there was this. The moon appeared to be completely, utterly, dry, with no evidence that water was ever present on its surface.

NASA’s Orion Soars on First Flight Test- Watch the lift off.

NASA’s Orion spacecraft launched successfully atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket Dec. 5 at 7:05 a.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orion’s Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), is the first flight test for NASA’s new deep space capsule and is a critical step on NASA’s journey to Mars. The 4.5 hour flight is scheduled to conclude with the splashdown of Orion in the Pacific Ocean.

ORION – NASA’s Deep Space Exploration Spacecraft – Explained in Detail

The testing of ORION – NASA’s Deep Space Exploration Spacecraft has been postponed once again. This video explains in detail NASA’s new deep space exploration spacecraft called Orion which will take humans farther into space than ever before including landing on an asteroid, the moons of Mars, and Mars itself.

Alex Filippenko – How will the Universe End?

Computer Simulation Visualizes History of the Universe

The simulation, called the Illustris, begins just 12 million years after the Big Bang and illustrates the formation of stars, heavy elements, galaxies, exploding super novae and dark matter over 14 billion years. (Courtesy: Illustris Collective).