Blog Archives

Lift Off to Mars: Documentary on space travel to Mars

Will space travel to Mars be possible in the future? Astronaut Thomas Pesquet hopes to be part of a crew lifting off to the red planet.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet spent six and a half months on the International Space Station ISS, which brings together researchers from all over the world. He conducted experiments in space to find out more about the potential of human spaceflight. Could we really send people to Mars? Thomas Pesquet was part of the crew of the ISS expedition 50/51 and spent 196 days on board the International Space Station (ISS). The astronauts were preparing for the moment mankind leaves its home to explore other celestial bodies like Mars, or the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The journey would lead through the most hostile environment of all: the vacuum of space. In the documentary, Thomas Pesquet describes the everyday challenges that await space travelers in their search for new worlds. Half of the experiments carried out on board the ISS have to do with human survival in space. On the ground, meanwhile, research laboratories around the world are dealing with the physiological problems associated with life in zero gravity, and space agencies are conducting isolation experiments under realistic conditions to find out what qualities astronauts need. Even the best-prepared missions can be jeopardized by the psychological problems that are inevitable during very long flights. Europeans, Russians and Americans are also working together on the technical aspects of interplanetary travel. Improving spacecraft propulsion, recycling waste, protecting astronauts from cosmic rays, developing ergonomic space suits and human-robot interfaces are just some of the issues being investigated on the ISS.

 

ONE OF THE MOST DETAILED ISS TOUR!!!

One of the most detailed tours of the ISS from American!!!

New Crew Launches to the International Space Station

Expedition 48-49 Soyuz Commander Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Kate Rubins of NASA and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft July 7 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-month mission.

What’s Up on the Space Station?

Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 47 Commander Tim Kopra of NASA and Flight Engineers Jeff Williams of NASA and Tim Peake of ESA (European Space Agency) discussed life and research on the orbital outpost during a pair of in-flight interviews March 22 with online technology media outlets Gizmodo and The Verge. Williams arrived on the station on March 19 for a six-month mission, his record-breaking third long duration flight on the complex. Kopra and Peake are more than halfway through their six-month stay on the station.

Expedition 47 48 Crew Docks to the Space Station

After launching earlier in their Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 47-48 Soyuz Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos and Jeff Williams of NASA arrived at the International Space Station on Mar. 19. The new crewmembers will join station Commander Tim Kopra of NASA and Flight Engineers Yuri Malenchenko of Roscosmos and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency, already onboard the station.

Space to Ground: See the Weekly Space Station Update from the International Space Station

NASA’s Space to Ground is your weekly update on what’s happening aboard the International Space Station. Got a question or comment? Use #spacetoground to talk to them.