Blog Archives

Chandrayaan 2 Mission Official Curtain raiser video by ISRO

Click below for Flip Book with information on the Mission from ISRO:

https://www.isro.gov.in/sites/default/files/flipping_book/gslvmkiii-m1chandrayaan2_launchkit/index.html

First Ever Black Hole Image – Event Horizon Telescope Press Conference

On April 10th, 2019, The Event Horizon Telescope team has released the image of the super massive black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy, whose mass is approximately 6.5 billion times that of the Sun.

Participants List for 4th Batch – Astronomy Camp on 7th January 2019

4th batch participants list (Classes-7-DPS Surat) for Astronomy Camp on 7th January 2018 to be held at DPS Tapi Campus.

SR NO Class &Sec Admission No. Student Name
1 VII-A E-0373-16 AADI ABHISHEK JAIN
2 VII-A N-1369-10 AAMIR RIYAZ AMIN
3 VII-A N-1505-10 AARUSH  POONIA
4 VII-A M-0674-09 ADVAITYA SANDEEP KHURANA
5 VII-A N-1350-10 AYAAN GENERAL
6 VII-A D-0325-15 JAI RAHUL MODI
7 VII-A N-1382-10 KARTIK ASHISH KATYAL
8 VII-A N-1455-10 KAVIISH HARSHAL KUMAR BHAGAT
9 VII-A P-0228-11 KRISHANG DEEPAK MITTAL
10 VII-A N-1405-10 RAGHAV ANKIT KADMAWALA
11 VII-A M-0638-09 ROHIT MICKY SURI
12 VII-A N-1344-10 SAKSHAM PUNIT BHASIN
13 VII-A M-0666-09 SAMBHAV JINENDRA BANTHIA
14 VII-A M-0690-09 SHREY SIDDHARTH VORA
15 VII-A N-1493-10 SHUBH PANKAJ GADIA
16 VII-B N-1358-10 AKSHIT K CHANDALIYA
17 VII-B A-0305-12 ARJUN MANEESH AGARWAL
18 VII-B M-0683-09 DARSH CHETANBHAI PATEL
19 VII-B D-0318-15 GOWTHAM PUGALENDHI
20 VII-B F-0282-17 JAY PANKAJ DASANI
21 VII-B N-1357-10 JIMIT BHARAT SINGHVI
22 VII-B N-1404-10 KRISH KUMAR  JAIN
23 VII-B M-0741-09 KRISH SUNDAR SURANA
24 VII-B N-1346-10 KUSH VARUN AGRAWAL
25 VII-B N-1436-10 LUCKY PRAMOD GOYAL
26 VII-B M-0752-09 SANHIL SUCHIT AGRAWAL
27 VII-B M-0675-09 SHREYANSH VIVEK AGRAWAL
28 VII-B G-0286-18 SHUBHAM AJAY HEMRAJANI
29 VII-B G-0288-18 SIDDH NITIN JAIN
30 VII-B A-0312-12 SMIT KIRITBHAI BHALANI

Lift Off to Mars: Documentary on space travel to Mars

Will space travel to Mars be possible in the future? Astronaut Thomas Pesquet hopes to be part of a crew lifting off to the red planet.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet spent six and a half months on the International Space Station ISS, which brings together researchers from all over the world. He conducted experiments in space to find out more about the potential of human spaceflight. Could we really send people to Mars? Thomas Pesquet was part of the crew of the ISS expedition 50/51 and spent 196 days on board the International Space Station (ISS). The astronauts were preparing for the moment mankind leaves its home to explore other celestial bodies like Mars, or the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The journey would lead through the most hostile environment of all: the vacuum of space. In the documentary, Thomas Pesquet describes the everyday challenges that await space travelers in their search for new worlds. Half of the experiments carried out on board the ISS have to do with human survival in space. On the ground, meanwhile, research laboratories around the world are dealing with the physiological problems associated with life in zero gravity, and space agencies are conducting isolation experiments under realistic conditions to find out what qualities astronauts need. Even the best-prepared missions can be jeopardized by the psychological problems that are inevitable during very long flights. Europeans, Russians and Americans are also working together on the technical aspects of interplanetary travel. Improving spacecraft propulsion, recycling waste, protecting astronauts from cosmic rays, developing ergonomic space suits and human-robot interfaces are just some of the issues being investigated on the ISS.

 

Avery Broderick Public Lecture: Images from the Edge of Spacetime

On Oct. 3, 2018, Avery Broderick (Perimeter Institute Associate Faculty member and Delaney Family John Archibald Wheeler Chair)

 

ONE OF THE MOST DETAILED ISS TOUR!!!

One of the most detailed tours of the ISS from American!!!

What’s Up for December 2018

The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before

Fly through the galaxy with American Museum of Natural History made possible by recently released data from the Gaia space telescope. In April 2018, the European Space Agency’s Gaia observatory released its second data catalog, which includes the distances to over 1.3 billion stars. Faherty breaks down why this information is so revolutionary, and explains how this information is helping scientists and non-scientists alike understand the universe like never before.

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/LOJ1XmbSKhM

Super Blue Blood Moon and Lunar Eclipse

Don’t miss the Lunar Eclipse tonight. It is special. It is a Super Blue Blood Moon and Lunar Eclipse. All three events in one. In Surat you can see it from 6:20 pm onwards.

 

What’s Up for January 2018

FAST: The World’s Largest Radio Telescope

In September 2016, China unveiled the world’s largest telescope – an instrument engineered so finely it is 3 times more sensitive than Arecibo and may help in the international search for understanding more on the origin of the universe and the Big Bang. Sadly, since filming this video, FAST’s chief engineer and scientist, Professor Nan Rendong lost his fight with cancer. Not only was Professor Nan a talented and well-respected scientist who dedicated over 20 years to the FAST project, but we found him to be a kind, intelligent and dedicated man who took the time to explain his work and the importance of it to us. The Five-Hundred-Metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, known as FAST had been constructed over five years in a remote area of Guizhou province, south central China. It was built in a 45 million year old crater, unlikely to be affected by flooding and far from human interference. The 500m dish surpasses Arecibo radio telescope, built in Puerto Rico in 1963, as the world’s largest and is three times more sensitive in detecting radio waves thousands of light years away. FAST consists of 4450 individual panels and Chinese project engineers had to design a cable net of ten thousand cables to manipulate it to detect signals. FAST’s focus cabin is also unique thanks to a directional tracking system. A key mission for the telescope will be detecting pulsars, the matter that remains when a star eight times the size of the sun explodes. These pulsars rotate thousands of times per second and are the universe’s most accurate clock. Experience the construction and meet the creators of FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope.

What’s Up for December 2017

What’s Up for December?  The Night Sky from NASA JPL. The best meteor shower of the year and brightest stars! See where and when to look.

Five Years of Curiosity on Mars

Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today. The rover currently is climbing through the foothills of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mountain formed from sediment brought in by water and wind. This talk will cover the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.

Speakers:
James K. Erickson, Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager, JPL
Ashwin R. Vasavada, Mars Science Laboratory Project Scientist, JPL

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Streamed live on 13 Jul 2017

Interstellar Flight – Documentary

Cosmic Journeys explores the challenges of interstellar flight and the technological possibilities that may one day send us on a long voyage out into the galaxy. What imperatives will define the mission when it launches and finally arrives: exploration and science, or a struggle for survival?

What’s Up for November 2017

Catch planet pairs and watch the moon pass stellar superstars! See Jupiter and Venus at dawn, the Moon shine near star clusters, and meteor activity all month long.

A Journey to Alpha Centauri – Christian Marois (SETI Talks 2017)

he Alpha Centauri star system is ideal to search for habitable planets by various observing techniques due to its proximity and wide range of stellar masses. Following the recent discovery of an Earth-size planet candidate located inside the Proxima Centauri habitable zone, Dr. Marois will discuss this remarkable discovery and the planet’s potential to find life. He will also present our current instrument project for the Gemini South observatory, TIKI, to discover similar planets around the two Sun-like pair located 15,000 AU from Proxima Centauri. The Alpha Centauri system is the prime target of the Breakthrough Starshot program, a project to send small quarter-size probes to take resolve images of these new worlds, and to prepare for Humanity’s first step into a new star system.

Dr Marois completed his Ph.D. at the Université de Montréal in 2004. The main topic of his thesis work was to understand the limits in exoplanet imaging and to design innovating observing strategies. After his thesis, he did postdoctoral researches at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of California Berkeley and NRC. In 2008, while at NRC, he led the team that took the first image of another planetary system (HR 8799) using the Keck and Gemini telescopes. He is currently pursuing his research at the NRC Herzberg where he is part of the Gemini Planet Imager campaign, and leading the development of instruments for imaging Earth-like planets at Gemini South and at the TMT.

What’s Up for May 2017

This month, Jupiter is well placed for easy evening viewing, Saturn rises before midnight, and the moon dances with Venus, Mercury and Mars.

Cassini’s First Dive Between Saturn and Its Rings

After the first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft called home to mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. See highlights from the scene at JPL on April 26-27, 2017, and some of the first raw images the spacecraft sent back from its closest-ever look at Saturn’s atmosphere. For more information about Cassini and its “Grand Finale,” visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

How radio telescopes show us unseen galaxies: Natasha Hurley-Walker

Our universe is strange, wonderful and vast, says astronomer Natasha Hurley-Walker. A spaceship can’t carry you into its depths (yet) — but a radio telescope can. In this mesmerizing talk, Hurley-Walker shows how she probes the mysteries of the universe using special technology that reveals light spectrums we can’t see.

What’s Up for April 2017

What’s up in the night sky this April? Jupiter, king of the planets is visible all night long, and the Lyrids meteor shower peaks on April 22

What’s Up for December 2016

Join the Astronomy camps during December and January at our Astronomy Club at DPS Tapi. The first one for DPS Tapi Students of grades 4 & 5 was held last night. They saw the crescent Moon, Venus, Mars and the Andromeda Galaxy through the telescopes. They also identified many constellations and the Summer Triangle. Today we have the Grade 7 boys from DPS Surat who will spend the whole night at DPS Tapi with the stars and heavenly bodies.

See Mercury, Venus and Mars all month long and a New Year’s Eve comet. With some luck, you may catch some Geminid and Ursid meteors, too. This short clip is from NASA JPL.

What’s Up for November 2016

This month, learn where and when to look for Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. Plus, more meteor showers to enjoy!

 

What’s Up for October?

What’s Up for October? Moon phases- Observe the Moon night and three meteor showers. Watch this video to get sky maps showing where and when to look.

What’s Up for September 2016

What’s up in the sky this month? An eclipse in Africa, two minor meteor showers, and planet and moon pair-ups. Plus: Get information now to help plan for the August 2017 total solar eclipse, which will span the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Dunes of Shangri-La on Saturn’s Moon Titan

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has radar vision that allows it to peer through the haze that surrounds Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. This video focuses on Shangri-la, a large, dark area on Titan filled with dunes. The long, linear dunes are thought to be comprised of grains derived from hydrocarbons that have settled out of Titan’s atmosphere. Cassini has shown that dunes of this sort encircle most of Titan’s equator. Scientists can use the dunes to learn about winds, the sands they’re composed of, and highs and lows in the landscape.

The radar image was obtained by the Cassini Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) on July 25, 2016, during the mission’s 122nd targeted Titan encounter.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini.

What’s Up for August 2016

The Making of a Satellite : Inside ISRO

New Crew Launches to the International Space Station

Expedition 48-49 Soyuz Commander Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Kate Rubins of NASA and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft July 7 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-month mission.

Juno’s Status at Jupiter

On July 5, just hours after NASA’s Juno spacecraft arrived at the planet Jupiter, NASA held a press briefing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California to provide a status update on the spacecraft. Juno’s arrival at our solar system’s most massive planet was the culmination of a nearly five-year journey through space. The spacecraft will be the first to orbit the poles of Jupiter –on a mission to provide new answers to ongoing mysteries about the planet’s core, composition and magnetic fields, as well as clues about the origins of our solar system.

Hello Jupiter! The Juno Mission

On July 4th, NASA Television aired live coverage of the solar-powered Juno spacecraft’s arrival at Jupiter after an almost five-year journey. Juno is the first spacecraft to orbit the poles of our solar system’s most massive planet. It will circle the Jovian world 37 times during 20 months, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the cloud tops, providing new answers to ongoing mysteries about the planet’s core, composition and magnetic fields.